Water

Our Water: San Angelo's water supplies

Where we draw the city's water from

San Angelo, TX - San Angelo is working to diversify the sources of our water. Having relied heavily on surface water for so long, starting with Nasworthy, then Twin Buttes and now O.H. Ivie, the last four years saw the introduction of the Hickory Aquifer.

"We have three different water sources we primarily pull from," said Tymn Combest, operations director for the San Angelo water treatment plant. "O.H. Ivie is the primary one. Sometimes we will pull from the Concho River, but normally it's all O.H. Ivie, or a blend of O.H. Ivie and the Hickory. Right now we're just running O.H. Ivie somewhere around 10 to 12 million gallons a day. Normally we will run the Hickory a couple times a month to keep it running, in case we do need it for blending."

By releasing into and drawing from the Concho River, the city can still utilize Twin Buttes to a smaller extent. Combest said the city usually uses the river if they are performing maintenance on the O.H. Ivie water line. The Concho River will come into play a bit more once the reclamation project is brought online. For now though, there is the Hickory aquifer water.

"When we run the Hickory," explained Combest, "...right now the maximum we can run is 8 million gallons per day. The 12 million gallons total for the city we run each day puts the Hickory at about two-thirds total of what we're currently running when the aquifer is used."

In the past the city also drew from E.V. Spence, but no longer, and officials are hesitant to do so again due to Spence suffering consistently poor water quality. But the city is still making progress, no longer solely reliant on surface water, which is greatly impacted by runoff contaminants and evaporation.
 

For the latest statistics on the six Concho Valley reservoirs, please click below:

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