Key Laws going into effect in Texas on September 1st

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(AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

During the 87th Legislative Session, the Texas Legislature passed a number of bills that were signed by Governor Abbott.

Below are a list of key Texas laws set to go into effect on September 1st and how they will impact Texans.

House Bill 1927: Constitutional Carry or Permitless Carry Law

According to the Texas Legislature, House Bill 1927 states the carrying of a firearm by a person who is 21 years of age or older and not otherwise prohibited by state or federal law from possessing the firearm and to other provisions related to the carrying, possessing, transporting, or storing of a firearm or other weapon; creating criminal offenses.

What does this mean?

Beginning September 1st, Texans will be permitted to carry a gun without a license, as long as the individual is not prohibited to do so by state or federal law.

According to State Rep. Matt Schaefer (R-Tyler), “People who are prohibited from possessing a handgun will still be prohibited from possessing a handgun.”

For more on House Bill 1927, click here.

Senate Bill 8: “Fetal Heartbeat Law”

According to the Texas Legislature, the bill would allow any Texas citizen to sue someone who performs an abortion or who aids or abets in the process, if a heartbeat is detected in the womb. A heartbeat could be detected within the first six weeks of pregnancy.

There is an exception in the law for medical emergencies.

What does this mean?

Senate Bill 8 does not limit the lawsuit to someone who performs an abortion, such as an abortion clinic.

The language of the bill also extends the possibility of suing those aiding in the process. Examples of these provided by KXAN, include giving a car ride to someone receiving the abortion, to giving advice, to donating to clinics that perform abortions.

There are currently multiple lawsuits filed against the state regarding this law.

For more on Senate Bill 8, click here

For more on Senate Bill 8 and lawsuits filed against the state from KXAN, click here.

House Bill 3979: Critical Race Theory Law

According to Republican State Senator Bryan Hughes (R-Mineola), “The bill would prohibit teaching concepts that one race or sex is superior to another, that one race or sex should be held to blame for actions committed in the past by other members of that race or sex.”

According to statement from Governor Abbott when signing House Bill 3979, “House Bill 3979 is a strong move to abolish critical race theory in Texas, but more must be done. The issue will be added to a special session agenda.”

What does this mean?

The objective of this law is to expand the ban on teaching critical race theory concepts in Texas classrooms.

While House Bill 3979 was signed into law and is set to going into effect on September 1st, the Texas Legislature is continuously working to determine what will be included in the ban.

For more on House Bill 3979, click here.

House Bill 1518: Alcohol Law

According to the Texas Legislature, “no person may sell, offer for sale or deliver any liquor (1) on New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, or Christmas Day (2) on Sunday; or (3) before 10:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m. on any other day.”

“A person who is registered guest of a hotel may consume or possess alcoholic beverages in the hotel bar at any time,” House Bill 1518 also states.

What does this mean?

Starting September 1st, Texans will be able to purchase beer and wine at stores at 10:00 a.m..

Hotels will be allowed to sell alcohol to hotel guests at any time of day.

For more on House Bill 1518, click here.

House Bill 1535: Medical Marijuana Dosage Limit Law

House Bill 1535 states, “medical use of low-THC cannabis by patients with certain medical conditions may be authorized as long as any part of the plant Cannabis sativa or compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, preparation, resin, oil of that plant that contains not more than one percent weight of tetrahydrocannabinols (THC).”

What does this mean?

Medical marijuana may be used for patients with certain medical conditions as long as the amount used does not contain more than one percent of THC.

For more on House Bill 1535, click here.

Senate Bill 4: National Anthem Law

Senate Bill 4 states, “agreements between governmental entities and professional sports teams requiring the United States national anthem to be played at team events.”

What does this mean?

When attending games involving pro sports team that contracts with the State of Texas, attendees will hear the “Star-Spangled Banner” play before any game.

For more on Senate Bill 4, click here.

House Bill 1540

House Bill 1540 states it is an offense otherwise punishable as a state jail felony to an individual being convicted for paying for prostitution to a maximum of two years of jail time for the first offense. It also expands felony charges against traffickers who recruit minors at youth treatment facilities and centers.

What does this mean?

If an individual is charged with paying for prostitution, they could face up to two years of jail time for the first offense.

Felony charges would be expanded to sex traffickers who recruit minors at youth treatment facilities.

For more on House Bill 1540, click here.

House Bill 929: Police Body-cam Law

House Bill 929 states, “a peace officer who is equipped with a body worn camera and actively participating in an investigation to keep the camera activated for the entirety of the officer’s active participation in the investigation unless the camera has been deactivated in compliance with that policy.”

What does this mean?

If a peace officer equipped with a body camera is participating in an investigation, the camera must remain on throughout the officer’s participation in the investigation unless the camera turned off in compliance with that policy.

For more on House Bill 929, click here.

House Bill 9

According to House Bill 9, an individual(s) obstructing a highway or other passageway is a state jail felony if the individual(s) prevent the passage of an emergency vehicle or obstructs access to a hospital or other health care facility that provides emergency medical care.

What does this mean?

If individuals are intentionally obstructing a highway or other passageway (such as protesting) preventing the passage of an emergency vehicle or blocks access to a hospital, those individuals could face felony related charges.

For more on House Bill 9, click here.

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