Rainstorm adds inches to SA's water supply

Rainstorm adds inches to SA's water supply

After the dryest start to a year in more than 100 years, San Angelo's six inch rain deficit was erased in three days.
After the dryest start to a year in more than 100 years,  San Angelo's six inch rain deficit was erased in three days.

For the first time in months, dozens of people are boating on Lake Nasworthy.  National Weather Service meterologists said Lake Nasworthy is now at 100% capacity.

At Twin Buttes reservoir, for the first time in a long time, the Equalization Channel is flowing and runoff from as much 8 inches of rain in the watershed has brought the water level in the North Pool up 7.5 feet.

"It's not going to end the drought. Before this rain began, we really needed 30-40 inches to get everything back to climatological normal," stated meteorologist Patrick Doll. "This is going to help with the drought, because our reservoirs are higher. But, it's not going to end the drought"

Yet, the National Weather Service meteorologist, who is based in San Angelo, said in order for the drought to end, San Angelo really needs two tropical storms.

"What we really need to put a very serious dent in the drought is really not even one; but, two tropical systems to come ashore... move up this way... and dump about 15-30 inches of rainfall," explained Doll.

What was good about the weekend rain storm is that it covered a wide area across the Concho Valley.

"It's usually one or two basins versus such a wide-spread area," finished Doll.

Another benefit from heavy rain is that the evaporation rate drops which means that, because of the amount of rain, less water is evaporating.

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