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First Local "Man Camps" Being Developed

"Man Camps" are being developed by a local construction company just west of San Angelo. The 138 unit project is expected to be completed in six months, with a few Dozen of the small living spaces available for rent as early as next week.
"Man Camps" are being developed by a local construction company just west of San Angelo.

The 138 unit project is expected to be completed in six months, with a few Dozen of the small living spaces available for rent as early as next week.

Connie Gonzalez reports...

"What do you do if you're an oilfield worker in the Concho Valley who needs a place to sleep, shower and eat, but are not willing to pay a steep $200 a night stay at a local hotel?

For thousands of workers the answer is a "man camp", and now they are being developed West of San Angelo on Arden road.

"When we first started breaking ground, people were wondering what the world is going on. You can see people going down the road at about 5 miles per hour look," said Railhead owner, John Brinkman.

Due to an increase in oil activity in the Concho Valley, the Owner of Railhead fully-furnished lodging, John Brinkman, says oil workers deserve a cheaper housing option.

"There seems to be a need for it so we're going to keep going as long as their is a need."

For about four times less than a local hotel, renters can enjoy similar amenities.

"This is just a less expensive way for them to be able to stay, but it's the same people that we're shopping next to in Wal-Mart or we're eating next to in a restaurant," Brinkman said.

Construction began just two months ago, and Brinkman says all 138 units are expected to be completed by this Fall.

"This gives them an avenue to work here, stay here, not have to drive."

Brinkman says over two dozen of the 12 X 24 feet units will available to rent by next week.

"The long-term effect once the oil field is gone, because some day that's going to happen, the idea is to be able to relocate these. They don't get left. They don't get left behind to rot and make the city look bad. They're designed for you to pick them up, move them, and use this area for something else in the future," Brinkman said.
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